The Library of Alexandria
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 208

The Library of Alexandria

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2005-01-14
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  • Publisher: I.B.Tauris

The Library of Alexandria was one of the greatest cultural adornments of the late ancient world, containing thousands of scrolls of Greek, Hebrew and Mesopotamian literature and art and artefacts of ancient Egypt. This book demonstrates that Alexandria became - through the contemporary reputation of its library - a point of confluence for Greek, Roman, Jewish and Syrian culture that drew scholars and statesmen from throughout the ancient world. It also explores the histories of Alexander the Great and of Alexandria itself, the greatest city of the ancient world. This new paperback edition offers general readers an accessible introduction to the history of this magnificent yet still mysterious institution from the time of its foundation up to its tragic destruction. 'Fascinating - [and] - should appeal to the general as well as the academic reader.' - The Anglo-Hellenic Review 'Informative, assiduously researched and exhaustively stimulating.' - Library Review

What Happened to the Ancient Library of Alexandria?
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 259

What Happened to the Ancient Library of Alexandria?

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2008
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  • Publisher: BRILL

This book aims at presenting a new discussion of primary sources by renowned scholars of the long disputed question of "What Happened to the Ancient Library of Alexandria"? The treatment includes a brilliant presentation of cultural Alexandrian life in late antiquity.

The Library of Alexandria
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 80

The Library of Alexandria

The Library of Alexandria was the largest library of its time and a major center for learning and scholarly research, particularly in the fields of astronomy, geography, mathematics, and medicine. Caesar and Cleopatra, Erastosthenes and Euclid, Archimedes and Alexander the Great are just a few of the famous people connected to its story. Today, historians still argue about how the library was destroyed, and no one knows exactly what it looked like, yet there is no question that the library continues to fascinate and intrigue us. This extensively researched look at what we do know about the Library of Alexandria features Kelly Trumble’s short, accessible chapters, and richly detailed full-color paintings by Robina MacIntyre Marshall. Together, they tell the story of one of the wonders of the ancient world, and show how its influence as continued long after its destruction. Glossary, suggested reading, selected bibliography, index.

The Library of Alexandria
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 44

The Library of Alexandria

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2017-01-26
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  • Publisher: Unknown

*Includes pictures depicting important people, places, and events. *Includes ancient accounts about the Library of Alexandria and its destruction. *Includes a bibliography for further reading. "When I wrote 'The Alexandria Link,' I discovered that we are only aware of about 10 percent of the knowledge of the ancient world. In the ancient world, most of the knowledge was destroyed." - Steve Berry In the modern world, libraries are taken for granted by most people, perhaps because their presence is ubiquitous. Every school has a library, large libraries can be found in every major city, and even most small towns have public libraries. However, the omnipresent nature of libraries is a fairly re...

The Vanished Library
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 205

The Vanished Library

Recreates the world of ancient Egypt, describes how the Library of Alexandria was created, and speculates on its destruction

The Ancient Library of Alexandria and Early Christian Theological Development
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 51

The Ancient Library of Alexandria and Early Christian Theological Development

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1993
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  • Publisher: Unknown

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Ink and Bone
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 355

Ink and Bone

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2015
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  • Publisher: Penguin

"Ruthless and supremely powerful, the Great Library is now a presence in every major city, governing the flow of knowledge to the masses. Alchemy allows the Library to deliver the content of the greatest works of history instantly, but the personal ownership of books is expressly forbidden ... When his friend inadvertently commits heresy by creating a device that could change the world, Jess discovers that those who control the Great Library believe that knowledge is more valuable than any human life--and soon both heretics and books will burn."--Dust jacket flap.

Bibliotheca Alexandrina
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 87

Bibliotheca Alexandrina

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2002
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  • Publisher: Unknown

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Library of Alexandria
  • Language: en

Library of Alexandria

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: Unknown
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  • Publisher: Unknown

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Aristeas to Philocrates
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 244

Aristeas to Philocrates

The work commonly known as the Letter of Aristeas presents an account of the genesis of the Septuagint, and incidentally reflects currents of religious thought at a significant period of history. The book is a work of conscious literary art, composed according to the canons of the Greek schools, and the exaggerations and inaccuracies that have marred its credit in the past are marks not of the author's ignorance or bad faith but of the genre to which it belongs. Considered against its historical and intellectual background, Aristeas to Philocrates is a document of first-class importance and a unique specimen of its kind in the literature of the period. Professor Hadas's edition studies the book from the point of view of its literary as well as religious affinities and significance. His introduction fixes the place of the book in the history of Greek literature as well as of the religious development of the Jews, and his running commentary similarly illustrates the text from both points of view. The translation is in straightforward English. The Greek text is that of H. St. J. Thackeray and the brief critical notes that accompany it are by Professor Hadas.