University of California Press Publications
  • Language: en

University of California Press Publications

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Ethnic Groups in Conflict
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 697

Ethnic Groups in Conflict

Drawing material from dozens of divided societies, Donald L. Horowitz constructs his theory of ethnic conflict, relating ethnic affiliations to kinship and intergroup relations to the fear of domination. A groundbreaking work when it was published in 1985, the book remains an original and powerfully argued comparative analysis of one of the most important forces in the contemporary world.

Catalogue, University of California Press Publications
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 256

Catalogue, University of California Press Publications

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Causes of Delinquency
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 309

Causes of Delinquency

Hirschi studies data and rejects the two prevailing theories -- the criminal is either one who is a frustrated striver forced into deliquency by his acceptance of goals common to us all or one who is an innocent foreigner attempting to obey the rules of a society that is not in a position to make the law or define "evil" conduct. Rather he states the case that delinquents are often free of serious intimate attachments, aspirations, and moral beliefs that bind most people under the theory of social control.

Sanctuaries of Spanish New Mexico
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 352

Sanctuaries of Spanish New Mexico

Description and history of the early churches and missions in New Mexico.

Us, Relatives
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 296

Us, Relatives

Anthropologists have long looked to forager-cultivator cultures for insights into human lifeways. But they have often not been attentive enough to locals’ horizons of concern and to the enormous disparity in population size between these groups and other societies. Us, Relatives explores how scalar blindness skews our understanding of these cultures and the debates they inspire. Drawing on her long-term research with a community of South Asian foragers, Nurit Bird-David provides a scale-sensitive ethnography of these people as she encountered them in the late 1970s and reflects on the intellectual journey that led her to new understandings of their lifeways and horizons. She elaborates on ...

Family Size and Achievement
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 415

Family Size and Achievement

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Nets of Awareness
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 256

Nets of Awareness

Frances Pritchett's lively, compassionate book joins literary criticism with history to explain how Urdu poetry—long the pride of Indo-Muslim culture—became devalued in the second half of the nineteenth century. This abrupt shift, Pritchett argues, was part of the backlash following the violent Indian Mutiny of 1857. She uses the lives and writings of the distinguished poets and critics Azad and Hali to show the disastrous consequences—culturally and politically—of British rule. The British had science, urban planning—and Wordsworth. Azad and Hali had a discredited culture and a metaphysical, sexually ambiguous poetry that differed radically from English lyric forms. Pritchett's beautiful reconstruction of the classical Urdu poetic vision allows us to understand one of the world's richest literary traditions and also highlights the damaging potential of colonialism.

Indian Traffic
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 237

Indian Traffic

The continual, unpredictable, and often violent "traffic" between identities in colonial and postcolonial India is the focus of Parama Roy's stimulating and original book. Mimicry has been commonly recognized as an important colonial model of bourgeois/elite subject formation, and Roy examines its place in the exchanges between South Asian and British, Hindu and Muslim, female and male, and subaltern and elite actors. Roy draws on a variety of sources—religious texts, novels, travelogues, colonial archival documents, and films—making her book genuinely interdisciplinary. She explores the ways in which questions of originality and impersonation function, not just for "western" or "western...

Music after the Fall
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 368

Music after the Fall

Music after the Fall is the first book to survey contemporary Western art music within the transformed political, cultural, and technological environment of the post–Cold War era. In this book, Tim Rutherford-Johnson considers musical composition against this changed backdrop, placing it in the context of globalization, digitization, and new media. Drawing connections with the other arts, in particular visual art and architecture, he expands the definition of Western art music to include forms of composition, experimental music, sound art, and crossover work from across the spectrum, inside and beyond the concert hall. Each chapter is a critical consideration of a wide range of composers, performers, works, and institutions, and develops a broad and rich picture of the new music ecosystem, from North American string quartets to Lebanese improvisers, from electroacoustic music studios in South America to ruined pianos in the Australian outback. Rutherford-Johnson puts forth a new approach to the study of contemporary music that relies less on taxonomies of style and technique than on the comparison of different responses to common themes of permission, fluidity, excess, and loss.